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Optimisation of high risk surgical patients improves mortality in clinical practice

Introduction

Deliberately increasing oxygen delivery (DO2) in the peri-operative period has been shown to improve survival for high risk surgical patients, in several randomised, controlled, trails [1].

Design, subjects and methods

A prospective study evaluating the efficacy of increasing peri-operative oxygen delivery in high risk surgical patients, to greater than 600 ml/min/m2 with dopexamine hydrochloride, in routine clinical practice

Results

Expressed as medians with 25%, 75% centiles.

Conclusions

An 11.9% 28 day mortality rate compares favourably with historical controls and clinical trials. This study confirms that the technique of increasing DO2 in the peri-operative period is both practical and beneficial in routine clinical practice.

Table 1 Table

References

  1. 1.

    Boyd O, Grounds RM, Bennett ED: . JAMA. 1993, 270: 2699-2707. 10.1001/jama.270.22.2699.

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Rhodes, A., Lamb, F., Newman, P. et al. Optimisation of high risk surgical patients improves mortality in clinical practice. Crit Care 1, P097 (1997). https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.1186/cc81

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Keywords

  • Oxygen
  • Public Health
  • Clinical Trial
  • High Risk
  • Mortality Rate